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CCA@CCA Hosts Virtual Brunch: A Conversation on Art in Times of Social Distance

Wednesday, September 23, 2020

This live Zoom event featured Bay Area-based artists, arts administrators, and activists who have had significant success in transitioning their programs for social distancing. Moderated by Sam Vernon (Assistant Professor, Printmedia Program). 

Participants included Ashara Ekundayo, Astria Suparak, PJ Gubatina Policarpio, and Martin Strickland.

Read a summary of this event by Katherine Hamilton on the Rewind Review Respond website.


Dioganhdih | The Circle: Autonomy Beyond the Nation State

Monday, October 5, 2020

Artist's talk with Mohawk water protector, land defender and rapper Dioganhdih. 

This video is no longer available.

Read a summary of this event by Menaja Ganesh on the Rewind Review Respond website.


Yosimar Reyes | The Circle: Autonomy Beyond the Nation-State

Tuesday, October 13, 2020

Artist's talk with Guerrerense/San Jose undocuqueer writer and activist Yosimar Reyes. 

This video is no longer available.


Graphic Design and Social Justice Activism

Tuesday, October 13, 2020

A lecture by Sabiha Basrai and Joy Liu-Trujillo of Design Action Collective. Design Action Collective is a worker-owned and managed cooperative that provides graphic design and visual communications for progressive, non-profit, and social change organizations. Its members aim to help build and strengthen progressive movements fighting for economic and social justice. 

Read a summary of this event by Gordon Fung on the Rewind Review Respond website.


Voting Story

Tuesday, October 13–Tuesday, October 15, 2020

Voting Story is a digital exhibition of photographs by students at CCA and Georgia State University in Atlanta. Photography majors in the courses Investigations 3 (CCA) and Portfolio One (GSU) were prompted to produce work that describes their personal voting stories. The result is a fascinating set of images that reveal the personal, political, and geographical factors that determine what voting means to each photographer. 

View this exhibition on the CCA Libraries website.

Read a review of this exhibition by Gordon Fung on the Rewind Review Respond website.


Sarah Lopez / Keynote Lecture for Make. Act. Resist: A Teach-In on Borders and Migration

Monday, October 19, 2020

Sarah Lopez is a built environment historian, as well as a migration scholar. Lopez' research focuses on the impact of migrant remittances—dollars earned in the U.S. and sent to families and communities in Mexico—on the architecture and landscape of rural Mexico and urban USA. Make. Act. Resist is made possible by generous support from Creative Citizens in Action, the Architecture Division, the President’s Diversity Steering Group, the Film Program, and the CCA Libraries.

A recording of this lecture is available to members of the CCA community on Panopto.

Read a summary of this event by Katherine Hamilton on the Rewind Review Respond website.


Las Nietas de Nonó | The Circle: Autonomy Beyond the Nation State

Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Artists' talk with the AfroBorikén community organizers, activists, and performance duo Las Nietas de Nonó.

This video is no longer available.


CCA@CCA Hosts Virtual Brunch: A Conversation on Performance Art in Times of Social Distance

Wednesday, October 21, 2020

For performance art in the age of social distancing, the show must go online. This live Zoom event featured randy reyes and CCA alum Maria Clara Merçon, two performance artists who continue to engage with their interactive projects by making videos, sharing work virtually, and collaborating with others. Co-moderated by Sam Vernon (Assistant Professor, Printmedia Program) and Menaja Ganesh (student outreach fellow for Creative Citizens in Action).

Read a review of this exhibition by Isha Tripathi on the Rewind Review Respond website.


Joshua Myers: The Black Radical Tradition; or a Poetics of a Liberation

Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Joshua Myers is associate professor of Africana Studies at Howard University. He is a writer and editor of A Gathering Together: Literary Journal and the author most recently of We are Worth Fighting For: A History of the Howard University Student Protest of 1989. He is currently working on a biography of Cedric J. Robinson and book on Black Studies and the nature and meaning of disciplinarity. This event was co-hosted by the Wattis Institute with the Graduate Program in Visual & Critical Studies and the Creative Citizens in Action Program Series.


Steph Rue Artist's Talk

Thursday, October 22, 2020

Steph Rue is a book artist and papermaker. She received her MFA in book arts from the University of Iowa Center for the Book in 2015. She studied traditional Korean book and papermaking on a Fulbright to Korea in 2015-2016. Steph currently resides in Sacramento, CA with her husband Daniel and one-year-old daughter Winnie. This event was presented by the BIPOC Virtual Open Print Studio.


Hardworking Goodlooking: Unrelearning

Friday, October 23, 2020

Hardworking Goodlooking (HWGL) is a publishing and graphic design hauz founded in 2013. HWGL generates, prints, and disseminates cultural publications (most of the time) out of the Philippines. HWGL is interested in decolonization of cultural labor, parlance in the vernacular, and the value of what has been invisible.

Video expires Friday, May 7, 2021 per the artists' instructions.

Read a summary of this event by Sarah Chieko Bonnickson on the Rewind Review Respond website.


Ron Rael / Keynote Lecture for Make. Act. Resist: A Teach-In on Borders and Migration

Monday, October 26, 2020

Ron Rael, Principal of Rael San Fratello and Professor at UC Berkeley, is a design activist, author, and thought leader within the topics of additive manufacturing, borderwall studies, and earthen architecture. His research interests connect indigenous and traditional material practices to contemporary technologies and issues. Make. Act. Resist is made possible by generous support from Creative Citizens in Action, the Architecture Division, the President’s Diversity Steering Group, the Film Program, and the CCA Libraries.


Mansur Nurullah Artist's Talk

Wednesday, November 11, 2020

Artist's talk with San Francisco-based artist Mansur Nurullah.  Mansur is a textile artist who transforms materials that are bound for the trash into tapestries, bags, dolls, and wallets. This event was presented by the BIPOC Virtual Open Print Studio.


Second Helping: CCA@CCA Post-Election Town Hall

Monday, November 16, 2020

Featuring Jocelyn Jackson, People’s Kitchen Collective; Conrad Guevara, artist representing Real Time & Space and Town Fridge; Larissa Gilbert, artist representing The Oxbow School in collaboration with 2727 California; and Lexa Walsh, artist representing Oakland Stock.

Read the Zoom Chat Transcript.


WE'ave THE PEOPLE

Tuesday, November 17–Tuesday, December 15, 2020

What possibilities do we see for reclaiming our civic lives and building cultures of gratitude and collectivity? WE'ave THE PEOPLE  is an activation of 12 public rituals synchronized in time on US election day Nov 3, 2020. From San Francisco to Sydney to Bogota, students instigate symbolic gestures attending to ruptures and repair. A virtual exhibition of project documentation and writing is on view at weavethepeople.cca.edu. Participating artists: Leonardo Barrera, Sarah Bonnickson, Gwen Dongfeng, Rosie Linares Diaz, Carolos Medellin, Rachel Parish, Nivedita Rajendra, Miguel Sarabia, Consuelo Hernandez, Jamin Viducic, Jianyou Zhang, and Minyue Zhou.

View this exhibition.


Aaron Coleman Artist's Talk

Wednesday, November 18, 2020

Aaron Coleman’s studio practice comprises an amalgam of creative processes and historical research. Coleman utilizes printmaking, painting, collage, sculpture, and installation to create works that address how mundane and seemingly anodyne artifacts embody the complex and pervasive history of race/racism and class/classicism in the United States. Employing a multi-media approach, Coleman reworks and re-contextualizes images and objects to foreground their interactions – both past and present – in this history. The objects (e.g., picket fences, coloring books, embroidery or pop-culture ephemera) are visually or physically juxtaposed with contrary or jarring images that release uncomfortable truths and suppressed stories which are both personal and political. This event wa presented by the BIPOC Virtual Open Print Studio.